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ANASAZI
Member
Male

Ace Mershon
Member
Male
54 years old
About Me

I am a farmer - rancher in western Arkansas.  



Alan Perry
Member
Male
About Me

I'm interested in starting a composite breeding program utilizing Tuli and various local breeds in my area including Red Angus, Limousin, Hereford, and Simmental. I would be practically starting from scratch. Luckily I have lots of time and great resources. Any help on where I could find information on these hybrids would be great!



Alwyn Marx
Member
Male
41 years old
About Me

 

Our farm is situated close to Burgersdorp in the Northern part of the Eastern-Cape province. The Stormberg mountain range forms a large part of our district, and thus our climate is prone to extremes. Our summers are hot, and winters are very cold with temperatures dropping below freezing on a regular basis. The average annual rainfall tends to be 450 mm, although the summer can be dry until late December. The area is known to be a cross-over zone between the Karoo and Free State province, thus our veldt consists of mixed grass and “bossieveld.”

It has taken a few years of research, and a couple of experiments, to decide upon which cattle breed would perform best in our region. Cattle breeding is a long staircase to climb. It takes time and we wanted to be certain that we climbed the correct one. We were looking for a breed of cattle, not only popular at present, but one that would be able to perform as markets and farming methods kept on changing.

People have become more health-conscious than ever before and there is a tendency in other countries for people to insist on organically produced “grass fed beef.” Input costs are rising and farmers need to diversify more, thus reducing the amount of time that they have to devote to their cattle. It was also important to find a breed that would be popular in the current feedlot market system, yet preferably be rounded off from veldt conditions. In this sense, we realised that it would have to be a breed with a finer bone structure, which could produce meat at a faster rate, be able to gain fat mass, as well as having a good muscle-to-bone ratio; a very important factor from a butcher’s point of view.

We also wanted to save on time, labour, and additional processing costs in order to reduce the input costs. This made us realise that it would have to be a breed which could deliver small calves at birth, yet be able to display rapid growth. On top of that, it also had to be a polled breed, hardened against diseases transferred by parasites, therefore an indigenous breed.

If one analyzes all the breeds, one will realise that it is difficult to find all these attributes in one breed, thus we were rather disappointed, until a friend and cattle expert, Stefan van Wyk, introduced us to the Tuli. On his recommendation, we purchased twenty female animals and the bull HWP 99 250 at the clearance stock sale of Mr Wallace Potgieter, who brought his farming enterprise to a halt.

We exposed the Tulis, as well as other breeds, to the same circumstances over a period of two years, and we saw that the twenty Tuli cows were in calf during both years, and that it wasn’t even necessary to assist during one birth, or burn one calf’s horns. On top of that, the cows weaned an average of 54% of their own weight.

In 2004, we joined the Tuli Society, and acquired additional female animals from Koot and Jan van der Walt of Rits Tuli’s, Russel Clark of HBH Tuli’s, Cornelius and Albie Rautenbach of Nonnie & Langlyf stud, Dave Mullins of Avondale stud, and finally from the stock clearance sale of Piet Smit and Hercu van Niekerk. We are very excited about the progress our Tulis have made, and look forward to each year’s calf produce.

It is our goal to strive towards breeding animals that can deliver marketable meat of great quality from the veldt, at the lowest cost, and least effort required. The Tuli perfectly fits into this picture, and we believe that they will balance more farmers’ books in the years to come.

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Andrew Hope
Site Owner
Male
About Me

I grew up with various Sanga breeds in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) starting with my own Tuli cattle in 1970. I later exported cattle to Namibia and South Africa.  Later, when I left Zimbabwe, I was involved with a family herd in South Africa, then moved to NC in the USA and started a herd there.                                                                                                         Due to my sponsors not applying for my green card, I had to leave the USA and am now in the UK for the time being, but involved in a number of projects involving different Sanga breds and their composites.



AsociaciĆ³n Sanga
Member
Male
18 years old
About Me

Asociación de criadores de ganado Sanga en Argentina

objetivos:

“Lograr producir carnes de excelente calidad, comparables con las de un británico, con la máxima eficiencia productiva ampliando la frontera ganadera"



Benjamin Vito
Member
Male
51 years old
About Me


Billy Griffin
Member
Male
About Me

I have a small cattle operation in Bandera County, Texas.  Purchased in March 2014 four fullblood bred Tuli cows.  I am interested in increasing my numbers of Tuli cattle in my pursuit to raise breeding stock adapted to my south central Texas ranching conditions that are easy keepers and require minimal inputs.

I am retired from a 35+ year career with the Natural Resources Conservation Service and have considerable experience in range, pasture, and wildlife management.

I currently run cattle on four separate parcels of land in Bandera County, Texas and one in Gonzales County, TX that total approximately 1000 acres of native grass/brush land.

I am interested in interacting with others who are raising Sanga type cattle.



BioGenetics Argentina
Member
Male
About Me


Bloodline Boran (Zippo Lamprecht)
Member
Male
30 years old
About Me

Since 2004 Bloodline Boran has been farming in the Southern and Eastern  Free State with a selection aim for hardy, fertile and early mature Boran cattle on natural veld./Sedert 2004 boer Bloodline Boran in die Suid- en Oos-Vrystaat met 'n seleksie vir geharde,vrugbaare en vroeryp Boran beeste op natuurlikeveld.



Bluegums Mashona Stud
Member
Female
About Me

I am a stud breeder of Mashona Cattle. The Mashona Society of Zimbabwe is now up and running and contact can be made via email: [email protected]



BobKinford
Member
Male
66 years old
About Me

Life long cowboy and low stress stockman and horseman



Brian Moolman
Member
Male
About Me

We farm in the coastal belt of the Eastern Cape near Nanaga with a herd of Bonsmara cattle.

Our veld is sweet and our winters are mild but we experience huge parasite problems, mainly ticks. Heart and redwater are rife and weekly dipping in summer is commonplace around here.

I would like to breed more Sanga into our heard to achieve: smaller frame, earlier maturing, higher fertility, and disiese resistence. At the moment I am quite interested in starting off with Tuli genetics.

Our cattle experience daily pasture moves, no feed, hay, licks, or pampering of any sort, including our bulls. Our heifers are bred at 15 months for 2 year old calving and run all year with the main herd. Our breeding season is 42 days and we cull all skips no second chances. We calve in early Jan to mid Feb. 

We believe this achieves weaning out the weak fast resulting in a genetic that is fit for a profitable low-input cattle enterprise.  




Cas Breedt
Member
Male
43 years old
About Me

Veldmaster breeder at Setlagole, North-West Province, South-Africa



Chaka Musiwa
Member
Male
37 years old

Chip
Member
Male
78 years old
About Me

Chip Hines

Born and raised on a farm and ranch at Burlington, Colorado, ranching was always Chip’s goal. After working on several ranches in the Kit Carson, Colorado area and meeting and marrying his wife, Judy, they began leasing land and buying cows. This journey into ranching began in 1968, which was the run-up to the big cattle break in 1974. Their first cattle cycle lesson. Chip has not forgotten! In 1989 he began planned grazing and decreased even more his low input philosophy.

The cattle industry has floundered in a rut of building unsustainable artificial environments for the last 40 years. Chip explains how to climb out of this rut and bring your operation into sustainability by concentrating on the basics of the natural world.

Semi-retired now, Chip published his first book on ranch management, Time To Change, in 2009 and How Did We Get it So Wrong in 2010. These were followed by a workbook, A Slantwise Guide to Prosperity in 2011. Chiphines.com



Chris
Member
Male
53 years old
About Me

We run roughly 100 stud cows in the Karoo near Graaff-Reinet, South Africa. This is a semi-desert shrubland which has become more grassy recently. We have just come through the worst drought on record. We started off with Tulis at the end of 2008 (in the middle of the drought). What has impressed me the most about Tulis is their ability to utilise forage that up until recently I considered as sheep food. They are prepared to eat Karoo shrubs that are quite woody and contain strong aromatic oils which reduces the shrubs' palatability. The shrubs are high in protein and sheep readily graze them but I have never seen cattle eat them readily. The Tulis through the winter 2012 (SH) were eating large volumes of shrubs so much so that there were definite fenceline differences between grazed and ungrazed paddocks.

Under these conditions we have had conception rates above 90% and this year (2012) we have had a 96% conception. We are still growing our herd and stud females are scarce so have been unwilling to be too strict on fertility (Yes I know we should be being strict but fertility is only about 5% hereditable). Once we have 120 female it will be very easy to cull any animal that skips since 1) you are trying to maintain your herd number so that there are plenty of replacements within your heifers and 2) one's own heifers are always cheaper than those you purchase elsewhere!

Tulis' docility, good carcass and the fact that they are predominately polled completes the package in my opinion.

 



Chris Rogers
Member
Male
67 years old
About Me

Marketing/sales manager for Afrivet Zambia Ltd since 2004, ex Zimbabwean cattle farmer and bred Tuli cattle personally as well as a family member of the 'Koce' Tuli herd that my brother Phil managed. Also had a Hereford and Brahman stud herds in my personal capacity. Phil managed the family Hereford, Senepol herds as well alongside the Tuli herd, also a large commercial breeding herd.

Currently trying to start a breeding herd here in Zambia. Have a close association with Johann Zietsman in assisting him with organising his 'Sustainable Livestock Production' courses throughout Zambia.



Danne Cranor
Member
Male
About Me

My name is Danne Cranor, and I own Cranor Cattle Company.  My family and I live in Williamson County, Texas, and we raise beef cattle throughout south-central Texas.  In addition to other breeds, we use Tuli and Bonsmara in our operation.  We believe the African Sanga breeds are perfect for production here in Texas because we have seen these cattle thrive over the years under some very harsh conditions.   Our website is www.CranorCattle.com, our office phone number is 512-856-0218, & our mobile phone number is 512-748-8150.  Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.



Darryn Browne
Member
Male
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